Dec. 18

The scene on the wharves to-day has been enlivening and animated. A large brig made her appearance in the harbor early in the fore-noon and anchored about a quarter of a mile from the wharves. There have also several large steamers been expected to arrive today and also a large number of troops for the expedition, neither of which, however, have yet made their appearance.

Today another four soldiers was carried to his last resting place. The sad duty was performed by the [purposely blank] Mass. Reg’t. There have been a good many deaths among the soldiers since my arrival at this place. And alas; my private opinion, from what I have seen, is, that not a few of the deaths that occur is the result of neglect. May God grant that I may never die at a hospital. Ten thousand times would I rather fall upon the field of battle, surrounded by all its terrors, and be buried by my surviving comrades in an honorable grave, than to be carried by the regardless [not legible] and interred in an unknown spot over which friends might shed a few tears, in token of sacred memory.

Today has been quite cool and cloudy, and strong indications of rain prevail.   

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Who’s Matthew Baird?

Entry from Baird’s diary.

Dec. 15

Still at the Hospital and likely to remain here for a while yet. No news of any importance from the Reg’t as yet. Everything seems to be quiet over the Potomac.

No special movement of the army has taken place since my absence from the regiment. The weather, although the season is so far advanced is remarkably mild and pleasant, no snow has as yet fallen and we have had but little frost.

My health is considerably improved, but still have a lingering cough.

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Who’s Matthew Baird?